prostheticknowledge:

OpenControllers

Interaction Design project by Marc Dubois is a collection of interfaces made with a smartphone and desktop IKEA products - video embedded below:

This project suggests combining common industrial objects with several sensors that smartphones are equipped with, such as the gyroscope or the camera, in order to create controllers that are easy to reproduce: a sphere and a cube that transmit 3D movements, as well as a cone that can locate a source of light. These controllers work with a game specially developed for them. This project remains full of possibilities which I look forward to discovering.

[Link]

Marc also has a Tumblr blog (saerus-io) here

magictransistor:

Nikolai Lutohin. Illustrations for Galaksija Magazine. 1970s.

(via shantrising)

vivalaglamourpuss:

an important factual presentation by me

All the facts.

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(via jymultipl)

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(via jymultipl)

psychedelic-psychiatrist:

desertwildflowers:

the-gasoline-station:

Burning Man 2014

Pictures: Jim Urquhart/Reuters

Source: The Atlantic In Focus

yep

Absolutely amazing

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startswithabang:

The Stars Beyond

"Each galaxy has a story. Some are small but growing rapidly. Others look bland but betray a complex, vibrant past. What’s more, most large galaxies — again like some cities — appear to be built upon the ruins of smaller, more ancient ones. Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is not unlike Rome in this respect. Ancient stellar remains show up viscerally in the the faint, extended outer reaches of galaxies — regions of light so diffuse that they’ve been difficult to study until recently."

You’ve no doubt heard of dark matter halos around galaxies: vast, extended, spherical collection of mass that reach for hundreds of thousands of light-years beyond what we typically think of as a spiral or elliptical galaxy. But did you know that galaxies contain vast, extended stellar halos as well? Moreover, they look nothing like you’d expect! They’re not spherical or even ellipsoidal, but highly irregular, and have an awful lot to teach us about how galaxies came to be the way they are today. Galaxy evolution expert James Bullock has the story.

(via fuckyeah-stars)

(via bornlazy)